Tag Archives: Good Fats

Wild Mushroom Soup – Dairy Free

wpid-wp-1424227428484.jpegI’m excited to share this recipe with you; I haven’t been coming up with much in the soup recipe department lately simply because I have so many great ones already that we rotate through regularly. I have however been meaning to work out a healthier version of the classic creamy mushroom soup and, in lieu of a bit of a mushroom kick I’ve been on lately, I finally have one to share!  This soup is so easy to prepare, you can use any mix of mushrooms you like and the creamy base is from cauliflower not cream.  Super healthy, very tasty and easy to prepare – perfect right?   As for the mushroom kick, I’m still feeling it, planning on going on a little wild mushroom picking course soon too so I’m sure another post-able mushroom recipe or two will come about.

Large heavy bottom soup pot
Butter and/or Oil
5          cups of water and broth
2          medium heads of Cauliflower, stemmed, broken into pieces
3          cloves Garlic, crushed
1          large Sweet Onion, chopped
2          teaspoons Onion Powder
2          tablespoons, fresh Thyme
6          cups mixed fresh Wild Mushrooms, (chanterelles, girolles, trompettes de mort, shiitake, oyster ect), clean, coarsely chopped
1          small bunch fresh Parsley, chopped
1          lemon, juiced
Sea Salt and Ground Pepper to taste
Truffle Oil *optional but worth it
Italian Mascarpone Cheese or Greek Goat Yogurt *optional

First step to this recipe is to boil the cauliflower, place the broken up pieces into your pot then add 2-3 cups of water, enough to just cover the cauliflower then boil with a lid on until the cauliflower is well cooked and very mushy.  Transfer to a blender or food processor and blend well.  Set aside.

In a fry pan, heat butter or oil and fry up the mushrooms with a little sea salt until they are browned.  Add chopped parsley, toss and set aside.

Rinse out the soup pot and return to the stove to medium-high heat, add some oil or butter and then sauté the garlic, onions and thyme until the onions are translucent.

Add onion powder, your broth (approximately one liter), the creamy cauliflower base and 1/3 to 1/2 of the sautéed mushroom mix, stir to combine and heat for 5 minutes to incorporate.

Return the soup to your blender or processor and blend until smooth.  At this point you can add a cup or two more water or broth to adjust thickness.

Return to pot, adjust sea salt and pepper, and add lemon juice.

To serve, ladle into bowls, pile some of your sautéed mushrooms on top and drizzle with truffle oil.

If dairy is not an issue for you it is nice to add a dollop of Mascarpone cheese or even a scoop of Greek Goat Yogurt but again, this is totally optional.

I also served this with a piece of crusty bread……so delicious.

Enjoy!

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GF Pumpkin Millet Muffins with Cranberries

wpid-2014-08-31-10.17.00.jpg.jpegHere is my new healthier version of a very Fall favourite muffin. Millet and Pumpkin go so well together and with all the spices and lightly sweet coconut sugar these muffins are the perfect chilly morning with tea kind of treat.
I chose to use half almond flour and half prepared gluten free flour mix but you could go all almond flour or go the other way and swap out the almond flour completely to make these nut free (omit the pumpkin seeds too then of course). Might change the baking time slightly but just keep an eye on them as they near the 25 minute mark. You could also use organic wheat flour if you wish. I use a full fat Greek goat yogurt here but you could use a dairy version or even buttermilk if you wish but do your body a favour and stay with organic and do not try to use a light yogourt. Only other ingredient detail to mention I think would be the cranberries, I only have juice sweetened cranberries in my kitchen, if you haven’t tried them yet I suggest you do, they are SO much tastier and better for you than the oiled sugar, sulphonated ones. Whole Foods carries them in bulk or every health food store should stock them. Pumpkin seeds can be purchased already toasted but to toast the millet, heat on medium high in a pan, shaking often until you hear them start to crackle and pop then remove. This recipe makes two dozen smaller muffins, filling the cups almost ¾ full but you can fill a one dozen pan to make 12 larger ones.

Oven 350 degrees
2 Muffin pans, oiled

3     large Organic Eggs
1/2  cup Coconut Oil, melted
1     cup Greek Goat Yogurt
3/4  cup Coconut Sugar
1     teaspoon Vanilla
1     can Organic Pumpkin Puree
1/2  cup Oats
1/2  cup Millet, toasted
1/2  cup Pumpkin Seeds, toasted
1/2  cup Juice Sweetened Cranberries
1     cup Almond Flour
1     cup Gluten-free Flour
2     teaspoons Baking Power
1 ½ teaspoons Baking Soda
1/2  teaspoon Sea Salt
2     teaspoons Cinnamon
1     teaspoon Ginger
1     teaspoon ground Nutmeg
1/2  teaspoons ground Cardamom

Beat Eggs with Oil, Yogourt, Coconut Sugar and Vanilla. I use a food processor but you can hand mix if you like.

Add Pumpkin, mix,

Add Oats, toasted Millet and Pumpkin Seeds, mix,

Add Cranberries, mix,

Add remaining ingredients and mix or process well.

Spoon into greased or lined muffin pan then sprinkle with coconut sugar and a few more pumpkin seeds.

Bake for approximately 25 minutes.

Macadamia Nut Pie – Gluten and Dairy Free

MacadamianutpieTwo months without a post! Turns out two holidays in two months makes for a happy, rested, tanned me but almost zero kitchen time. Happy to be back refreshed and eating my way again. Since I just returned from Hawaii I thought I share this healthier twist on a traditional Macadamia Nut Pie. I brought home a few bags of nuts so I think I’ll make this one again soon =) Enjoy!

Oven to 325°F
9 inch pie crust
Medium bowl:
1/2     cup Coconut Sugar
1/2     cup Coconut Syrup
3          large Organic Eggs
3          tablespoons Organic Unsalted Butter, melted
2          teaspoons Vanilla Extract
2 1/4 cups Roasted Unsalted Macadamia Nuts, chopped (reserve some to top with)

Whisk sugar, syrup, eggs, butter and vanilla in large bowl.

Fill pie crust with nuts then pour pie mixture over nuts.

Bake pie until center puffs slightly, about 55 minutes.

Serve with vegan whipped topping, or coconut ice cream and top with more chopped nuts.

Gluten-free Almond Hazelnut Biscotti

wpid-20140303_224719.jpgHere is another nut milk pulp recipe, I have always wanted to work out a gluten-free biscotti recipe and since I often have left over nut milk pulp on hand I am thrilled that I was able to make this recipe work using that.  Unfortunately I will have to get back to you on a gluten-free biscotti recipe without the left over pulp, I suspect it will work using Almond Flour too but again I’ll need to experiment.  These turned out great, can’t wait to share them, also looking forward to having one with a coffee tomorrow.  Yum!

Oven 350 degrees
Parchment paper lined baking sheet
Electric mixer
Large bowl:
2              cups Almond and Hazelnut Pulp (from making milk)
1/2         cup Sorghum Flour
1/2         cup Millet Flour
1/4         cup ground Flax
1              teaspoon Baking Powder
1/2         teaspoon Sea Salt
1/2         teaspoon Xanthan Gum
Medium bowl:
1/2         cup Coconut Sugar
1/2         cup Cane Sugar
1/2         cup Butter or Coconut Oil, room temp (I use Goat Butter)
2              Eggs
1              teaspoon Vanilla Extract
1              teaspoon Almond Extract
Zest       of one Lemon
1              cup Slivered Almonds and Chopped Hazelnuts, toasted*

*Toast the slivered almonds and chopped hazelnuts for about 10 minutes as the oven is warming

Combine all the dry ingredients in a large bowl, mix then add the nut pulp and mix again.

In a medium bowl, cream together sugars and butter/oil with an electric mixer.  Add eggs, mix, extracts and zest and mix more.

Add wet to dry and mix some more to form a heavy dough then, hand stir in the toasted nuts.

Divide dough into two pieces.  Using your parchment paper, form and roll each piece into logs almost as long as your cookie sheet. Transfer the logs and parchment paper onto the baking sheet and arrange the rolls side by side. Gently press the rolls down ever so slightly so they are approximately 1 inch thick tall.

wpid-20140303_170845.jpgBake for 30 to 35 minutes until just golden brown. Remove from oven and allow to cool on a cutting board. When the rolls are set and cool enough to handle, carefully, with a sharp knife, slice crosswise into 1/2 inch slices.

Arrange the slices back on the baking sheet and bake at 325 degrees for an additional 10-15 minutes on each side. Slices should be lightly browned and not too moist.

Makes approximately 24 biscotti.  If they soften, crisp or reheat them in a toaster/oven before serving.

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Moose Jerky

wpid-20140213_081005.jpgGot some moose meat given to me this weekend! Better than flowers to this women =)  So many things I could do with it but with this round I decided to turn it into jerky.  Good jerky with healthy simple ingredients and no crap added is tough to find and often expensive.  I’ve posted a Salmon Jerky (oven dried) before so I figured it be good to do a red meat one too.  I’ve used ingredients I have on hand in my kitchen for a basic marinade which is really just healthier versions of traditional products and the jerky turned out perfect.  Not too salty,  just the right amount of sweet, smoke and spice.  If you like it more sweet or spice, simply add more!

2             lbs Moose, Rump Roast or Top Round
1             cup Braggs Liquid Aminos
1             cup Gluten-Free Tamari
¼           cup of Gluten-Free Worcestershire Sauce
1             cup Coconut Sugar
2             tablespoons Smoked Paprika
1/2        cup Teriyaki BBQ Sauce (I use an organic one that contains pineapple juice)
1             teaspoon of Chili Peppers or Coarse Black Pepper to taste

20140212_163322Slice roast into slabs approximately 1/4 inch thick strips.

In a large sealable container, combine the marinade ingredients, stir well then add strips of meat. Close or cover and refrigerate for minimum 2 hours, up to 12 hours.

Place strips on dehydrator racks, without overlapping. Dry at 140-160F. for the first 3-4 hours. The temperature may be reduced to as low as 130 after 4 hours to finish drying (total hours 12-20)  all depending on how dry you like your jerky.  If necessary, occasionally blot the jerky with paper towels as it dries to remove beads of oil. Test jerky for dryness by cooling a piece. When sufficiently dry, cooled jerky will crack (but not break in two) when bent. There should be no moist spots.

TIP: If jerky is too brittle, brush on a little Worcestershire sauce or soy sauce to soften it.

No food dehydrator? …..

jerkyYou can use your oven!  Hang the strips on skewers on one end of the oven.  Some ovens can be set low, in this case follow the same temperature instructions as above.  If not, set your oven to its lowest (probably 150 or 160) and dry for 4 to 5 hours with the door slightly cracked open, use a metal spoon or something heat safe to hold it open.

Cut cool jerky into 2 to 4″ pieces before storing. Jerky containing salt and cured without a commercial curing preparation may be stored at room temperature for 1 to 2 months. If air humidity is low, the container should have a loose-fitting lid or one with holes punched in it. Good air circulation keeps the flavour fresher. If the humidity of the air is more than 30%, store jerky in an airtight container. Jerky may be refrigerated or frozen to increase shelf life and maintain flavour.

Don’t waste that left over marinade either, pour into a pot and bring to a boil for 3-5 minutes then cool and store to use as a BBQ sauce for chicken or something later.

Deer Stew and Burgers

I am actually posting this one a year later…where does the time go….an amazingly cool girl friend of mine gifted me deer from her first ever hunt last Winter, pretty awesome and kinda special I think (I knitted her a toque). Actually, irronically, knitting is the reason I haven’t been food blogging as much ha but anyways….  Now I don’t eat a lot of meat but when I do its always free range or grass fed and a major bonus if hunted in its natural environment by a friend none-the-less! I understand hunting could be a sensitive topic for some but personally, I love wild sourced meat and if you’ve actually hunted and prepared it yourself, even better.   If you’re a meat eater I think it’s the most respectful way to get it and by any comparison with the factory-produced, chemical-drenched, hormone filled, fat-laden pseudo-meat that too many North 

deer stew

Americans grow obese and sick from eating today, wild meat — fish, fowl or red — is brilliantly natural, inimitably healthy and morally superior.  Ahem …..ok on that note here is my deer burgars and my take on a classic simple deer stew recipe.   And much love to Heather for sharing her deer.

Deer Stew

1              teaspoon fresh ground pepper
1              teaspoon dried Oregano
1              teaspoon dried Thyme
1              teaspoon Garlic Powder
1/4         cup Flour (I use a mix of brown and sweet rice floor)
2-3          tablespoons high heat oil like Grape Seed
3               large cloves Garlic, crushed
3              large Sweet Onions, coarsely chopped
1              lb Carrots, sliced
1              Bay Leaf
1/2         cup Red Wine
1              tablespoon Worcestershire sauce (I use gluten-free)
3              cups Low Sodium Broth  (I use sea salted vegetable)
2              lbs  Potatoes, cubed or sliced (I use mixed little gems and just cut them in half)
2              tablespoons Starch: Arrowroot, Potato  or Cornstarch

Sea salt to taste

Season meat with pepper, oregano, thyme and garlic powder then dust with flour.

Heat oil in large heavy bottomed stewing pot. Sauté meat until browned.

Add garlic, onions, carrots, bay leaf, wine, worcestershire and broth. Simmer, covered, for about 1 1/2 hours or until meat is tender.

Add potatoes and cook another 30 minutes, or until potatoes are tender.

Mix starch with an equal amount of water. Stir into stew until mixture has thickened.

Adjust Salt and Pepper.

Enjoy!

Venison Burgers 

I was surprised at the lack of recipes online for Venison Burgers, what I did notice though is most had some sort of fat added to them as Deer meat, similar to Bison which I work with more often, is very lean.  With Bison Burgers I add oil, here I used bacon and was quite happy with the results, now of course if pork isn’t your thing, and honestly it rarely is mine, you can omit the bacon and simply add a healthy high oil of your choice.  A high heat oil would be best but I think olive oil would be okay if you are planning to make a more rare burger. Also if you omit the bacon you should ass some sea salt.

1-2          pounds Deer Meat
1              teaspoon fresh Parsley, chopped
1              teaspoon fresh Thyme, chopped
1/4         teaspoon Smoked Paprika
6              slices of Bacon
2              Shallots, diced
2              cloves of Garlic
1              tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce
1              tablespoon Dijon Mustard
1              Egg
1/4         cup Panko Bread Crumbs or Gluten-Free Bread Crumbs *optional

In a bowl, combine ground Deer with fresh ground pepper and chopped spices and set aside.

Pan fry bacon, once cooked to crisp, remove from the pan and set aside.  Now cook onions garlic in the bacon fat till just soft.  Remove from heat to cool.

Combine deer, worcestershire, mustard, and onions, garlic with the bacon fat and mix well with your hands.  Now add the egg and the bread crumbs if you are using them.  Cover bowl and refrigerate for about an hour.  Once chilled, form 4-6 patties and then grill!  Can be frozen for later use.   Cook from frozen.

Chestnut, Parsnip and Fennel Soup

fennel parsnip soupHere is a little different soup perfect for Winter; I try to eat food that is local and in season so fennel and parsnips fit right into that rule and chestnuts are a staple in my kitchen this time of year, they pop up in the grocery store in the Fall but you can get canned ones all year round.  It’s fun to oven roast chestnuts to eat as a snack but kind of an extra step for making soup, I honestly went to Whole Foods and got an organic can of chestnuts for this soup (NOT TO BE CONFUSED with Water Chestnuts!).

chestnutsNutritionally this soup has it going on: Chestnuts, unlike other nuts and seeds, are relatively low in calories, contain less fat but are rich in minerals, vitamins and phyto-nutrients that benefit health, they are exceptionally rich in vitamin-C and folates, they are a good source of mono-unsaturated fats, and an excellent source of minerals such as iron, calcium, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus and zinc, besides providing a very good amount of potassium and B-Complex Vitamins!   Parsnips are rich in several in Vitamin C, E and K, folate, thiamine, pantothenic acid, riboflavin, niacin and B-6.  , Parsnips are also an excellent source of minerals such as copper, potassium, magnesium, calcium, iron, manganese, selenium and zinc.  Fennel is a super food, has many health benefits and aids in digestion.  Follow this LINK to see more in-depth breakdown of its value.

Medium-large heavy bottomed soup pot
2          tablespoons Sunflower Oil
1          Leek, thinly sliced (white and pale green only)
1          tablespoon Fennel Seeds, lightly crushed
1          Fennel Bulb, coarsely chopped
2          medium/large Parsnip, peeled and diced
1          cup Chestnut, cooked and peeled
6          cups Vegetable Broth

Sea Salt and Ground Pepper

Heat oil over medium/high heat and sauté the leek, fennel seeds and fennel until slightly softened.

Add Parsnips and chestnuts and pour in broth.  Bring to a boil then reduce and simmer until the parsnips are soft.

Remove from heat and puree the soup until silky smooth.  Season with sea salt and pepper.