Tag Archives: Healthy

Sprouted Buckwheat Granola with Cinnamon, Dates and Maple

Happy New Year Food Book Followers! Hope you all had a nice break and got lots of time with loved ones. I had a wonderful last couple weeks of 2014 and am looking forward to what 2015 brings. Only one more day and I will be back to my reality of crazy busyness.  Unfortunately I will continue to likely be too busy to create much of anything new and post between now and April but, I do have a few new recipes from the past few months jotted down to share and will do my best to get them out.

wpid-20141208_171530.jpgEach year I have created  healthier versions of holiday baking classics and posted but this year, with my time limitations and being in the midst of exams until mid December, I had to do something a little different.  I actually didn’t do ANY  baking this holiday – gasp!  I did however make massive quantities of my sprouted buckwheat granola and jarred that for my friends and family.

wpid-20141206_230925.jpgI have meant to post this simple recipe for a while now, the main reason I haven’t is because I never measure what I put into it.  Now, I am giving you measurements but I encourage you to splash, sprinkle and pinch to your own liking rather than just following the recipe. I prefer my granola lightly sweetened, for the purposes of gifting and this recipe I made it a bit sweeter.  Its nothing like you’d find in a store bought version as far as sweetness goes so if you prefer little sweetness too the measurement I provide is probably sufficient. You can always adjust if you wish on your next batch.

To sprout buckwheat, or any grain for that matter, all you do is soak, rinse and repeat until the grain cracks.  With buckwheat this usually takes about 3 days.  If you look closely you will be able to see some tiny sprouting tails. Buckwheat groats give off a really goopyness while soaking, just keep it covered with fresh water on your counter for 3 or so days, rinsing it and covering with new water each day.   When it is done soaking and just sprouting, rinse well and strain well.  Sprouting is so great.  The health benefits are numerous, it can turn a hard-to-digest whole buckwheat kernel into a light, nutrient-dense whole grain. All grains contain certain anti-nutrients inherent in the seed. These anti-nutrients preserve the seed until it has a chance to germinate and grow. By soaking and sprouting you reduce anti-nutrients and make the grain more readily available and digestible.  That’s all I’m going to write about sprouting benefits right now, if you are looking for more, Google has it covered. But whatever you do, DO NOT skip this part for this recipe!  Oh yes, and use raw buckwheat groats, toasted will not sprout, and, use all organic, quality ingredients!

wpid-20141208_171541.jpgThis recipe is dehydrated in the oven, I have posted before about using your oven for dehydrating.  If your oven sets as low then you are good to go at about 150 degrees, just set it and keep an eye on the dryness over the next couple days.  If your oven only goes as low as 170 or so degrees as my current oven does, it is still totally doable, just use a metal spoon or utensil to keep the door cracked open which allows moisture and extra heat to escape.  This recipe usually takes about 48 hours to dry out.  If you do a double batch, (which I often do) it might take longer but just keep an eye on it.

2       large baking sheets lined with parchment paper
6       cups Sprouted Buckwheat Groats (about 4 cups pre-soaking)
1        cup Hemp Seeds
1        cup Chia Seeds
1/2   cup Dates, chopped
1/4   cup Cinnamon
1/4   cup Maple Syrup
3-4   tablespoons Coconut Oil, melted
1        teaspoon Himalayan Mineral Salt

Combine buckwheat, melted oil, maple, cinnamon, and sea salt then divide on two parchment paper lined baking sheets to dehydrate in your oven for 24 to 48 hours. (I love cinnamon and always sprinkle extra on top before putting into the oven).  When done drying combine with the hemp and chia seeds and chopped dates.

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Wild Mushroom Soup – Dairy Free

wpid-wp-1424227428484.jpegI’m excited to share this recipe with you; I haven’t been coming up with much in the soup recipe department lately simply because I have so many great ones already that we rotate through regularly. I have however been meaning to work out a healthier version of the classic creamy mushroom soup and, in lieu of a bit of a mushroom kick I’ve been on lately, I finally have one to share!  This soup is so easy to prepare, you can use any mix of mushrooms you like and the creamy base is from cauliflower not cream.  Super healthy, very tasty and easy to prepare – perfect right?   As for the mushroom kick, I’m still feeling it, planning on going on a little wild mushroom picking course soon too so I’m sure another post-able mushroom recipe or two will come about.

Large heavy bottom soup pot
Butter and/or Oil
5          cups of water and broth
2          medium heads of Cauliflower, stemmed, broken into pieces
3          cloves Garlic, crushed
1          large Sweet Onion, chopped
2          teaspoons Onion Powder
2          tablespoons, fresh Thyme
6          cups mixed fresh Wild Mushrooms, (chanterelles, girolles, trompettes de mort, shiitake, oyster ect), clean, coarsely chopped
1          small bunch fresh Parsley, chopped
1          lemon, juiced
Sea Salt and Ground Pepper to taste
Truffle Oil *optional but worth it
Italian Mascarpone Cheese or Greek Goat Yogurt *optional

First step to this recipe is to boil the cauliflower, place the broken up pieces into your pot then add 2-3 cups of water, enough to just cover the cauliflower then boil with a lid on until the cauliflower is well cooked and very mushy.  Transfer to a blender or food processor and blend well.  Set aside.

In a fry pan, heat butter or oil and fry up the mushrooms with a little sea salt until they are browned.  Add chopped parsley, toss and set aside.

Rinse out the soup pot and return to the stove to medium-high heat, add some oil or butter and then sauté the garlic, onions and thyme until the onions are translucent.

Add onion powder, your broth (approximately one liter), the creamy cauliflower base and 1/3 to 1/2 of the sautéed mushroom mix, stir to combine and heat for 5 minutes to incorporate.

Return the soup to your blender or processor and blend until smooth.  At this point you can add a cup or two more water or broth to adjust thickness.

Return to pot, adjust sea salt and pepper, and add lemon juice.

To serve, ladle into bowls, pile some of your sautéed mushrooms on top and drizzle with truffle oil.

If dairy is not an issue for you it is nice to add a dollop of Mascarpone cheese or even a scoop of Greek Goat Yogurt but again, this is totally optional.

I also served this with a piece of crusty bread……so delicious.

Enjoy!

Gluten-free Almond Hazelnut Biscotti

wpid-20140303_224719.jpgHere is another nut milk pulp recipe, I have always wanted to work out a gluten-free biscotti recipe and since I often have left over nut milk pulp on hand I am thrilled that I was able to make this recipe work using that.  Unfortunately I will have to get back to you on a gluten-free biscotti recipe without the left over pulp, I suspect it will work using Almond Flour too but again I’ll need to experiment.  These turned out great, can’t wait to share them, also looking forward to having one with a coffee tomorrow.  Yum!

Oven 350 degrees
Parchment paper lined baking sheet
Electric mixer
Large bowl:
2              cups Almond and Hazelnut Pulp (from making milk)
1/2         cup Sorghum Flour
1/2         cup Millet Flour
1/4         cup ground Flax
1              teaspoon Baking Powder
1/2         teaspoon Sea Salt
1/2         teaspoon Xanthan Gum
Medium bowl:
1/2         cup Coconut Sugar
1/2         cup Cane Sugar
1/2         cup Butter or Coconut Oil, room temp (I use Goat Butter)
2              Eggs
1              teaspoon Vanilla Extract
1              teaspoon Almond Extract
Zest       of one Lemon
1              cup Slivered Almonds and Chopped Hazelnuts, toasted*

*Toast the slivered almonds and chopped hazelnuts for about 10 minutes as the oven is warming

Combine all the dry ingredients in a large bowl, mix then add the nut pulp and mix again.

In a medium bowl, cream together sugars and butter/oil with an electric mixer.  Add eggs, mix, extracts and zest and mix more.

Add wet to dry and mix some more to form a heavy dough then, hand stir in the toasted nuts.

Divide dough into two pieces.  Using your parchment paper, form and roll each piece into logs almost as long as your cookie sheet. Transfer the logs and parchment paper onto the baking sheet and arrange the rolls side by side. Gently press the rolls down ever so slightly so they are approximately 1 inch thick tall.

wpid-20140303_170845.jpgBake for 30 to 35 minutes until just golden brown. Remove from oven and allow to cool on a cutting board. When the rolls are set and cool enough to handle, carefully, with a sharp knife, slice crosswise into 1/2 inch slices.

Arrange the slices back on the baking sheet and bake at 325 degrees for an additional 10-15 minutes on each side. Slices should be lightly browned and not too moist.

Makes approximately 24 biscotti.  If they soften, crisp or reheat them in a toaster/oven before serving.

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Hazelnut Dark Chocolate Chunk Cookies – (GF, DF, Vegan)

download (1)Having a bit of a hazelnut fest here, made a batch of hazelnut milk yesterday and will be working on a gluten-free hazelnut biscotti recipe with the pulp later this week but for now you can have this chocolately, gooey, delicious little cookie recipe inspired by a Nuttella loving little guy I worked with this weekend. Who doesn’t love the combo of chocolate and hazelnuts and I LOVE chocolate, particularly really dark chocolate.   I always have 99% Unsweetened Calbert on hand and use it to make my own chocolates, in smoothies or whatever, but, for this recipe feel free to use any chocolate you love.  Choose a quality bar and simply chop it up, the darker to better for you but I think with all the other healthy ingredients in these cookies you can afford to have the chunks be a little not so healthy 😉

Oven 350 degrees
Baking sheet lined with parchment paper

Medium Bowl

1              tablespoon Ground Flax OR Ground Chia mixed with 3 tablespoons water
1/4         cup Coconut Oil
1/4         cup Hazelnut Butter
1/3         cup Coconut Sugar
1/3         cup Cane Sugar
2              teaspoons Vanilla Extract
Use a hand blender to mix well then add dry:
1.5          cups Gluten-free Oat Flour
3              tablespoons Cocoa Powder
1/2         teaspoon Baking Soda
1/2         teaspoon Baking Powder
1/2         teaspoon Sea Salt
1-2          teaspoons Hazelnut, Almond or other non-dairy Milk
1/2         cup Dark Chocolate, chopped
1/2         cup Hazelnuts, lightly roasted, skins rubbed off and chopped
1/4         cup Raw Cacoa Pieces *optional

First mix together ground flax or chia (this is your egg replacer) and water and set aside for 5 minutes.  Then, add the rest of the wet ingredients and with a hand mixer, mix until smooth.

Add dry ingredients.  Mix again.  Add milk just to moisten up a bit if necessary. The dough is sticky, much like a peanut butter cookie.

Add chopped chocolate, roasted, skin removed, chopped hazelnuts and raw cacoa pieces if using and then use a wooden spoon to incorporate.

Divide into 12 batter balls, shape and slightly flatten with a spoon.  Sprinkle with coarse sea salt then bake for 12-15 minutes.

Cool on a rack.wpid-20140302_082651.jpg

Maca

macaMaca Root is a nutritionally dense super-food that contains high amounts of minerals, vitamins, enzymes and all of the essential amino acids. It is rich in B-vitamins, which are the energy vitamins, and is a vegetarian source of B-12.

Maca is rich in bioavailable dietary minerals calcium and potassium (with low content of sodium), and contains the essential trace elements iron, iodine, copper, manganese, and zinc as well as fatty acids including linolenic acid, palmitic acid, and oleic acids, and 19 amino acids.

Maca is used for  enhancing energy, stamina, athletic performance and memory. It has been said to help balance our hormones and due to an overabundance of environmental estrogens, most people’s hormones are a bit out of whack.  Maca stimulates and nourishes the hypothalamus and pituitary glands which are the “master glands” of the body. These glands actually regulate the other glands, so when in balance they can bring balance to the adrenal, thyroid, pancreas, ovarian and testicular glands. Instead of providing hormones to the body, maca works as an adaptogen which means that it responds to different bodies’ needs individually. If you’re producing too much of a particular hormone, maca will help regulate the production downward. However, if you’re producing too little, it’ll regulate the production upward. Hormones regulate many things in the body including mood, growth, sexual development, and tissue function. Hormones also play a role in many diseases, like cancer and depression. Maca root has been shown to be beneficial for all sorts of hormonal problems including PMS, menopause, and hot flashes.  It has been reported to have aphrodisiac properties, be a fertility enhancer and is best known for improving libido and sexual function in men and women.

Maca is an exceptionally hardy root plant native to the Andean mountain plateaus of Peru. A member of the brassica family, maca is grown at altitudes of 14,000 feet in poor volcanic soil and an extreme climate of freezing cold, fierce winds and intense sunlight, where no other crops can survive. Herbalists believe that resilient plants are especially valuable; from an herbological perspective, maca’s resiliency knows no equal. Ancient, native Peruvians used maca for thousands of years as both a food and a tonic. They believed maca increased energy and stamina, improved fertility and enhanced libido.

Maca hypocotyls may be gold or cream, red, purple, blue, black, or green. Each is considered a genetically unique variety, as seeds of the parent plants grow to have roots of the same color. Recently, specific phenotypes (in maca, ‘phenotype’ pertains mainly to root color) have been propagated exclusively to ascertain their different nutritional and therapeutic properties.  Cream coloured roots are the most widely grown and are favoured in Peru for their enhanced sweetness and size.

Darker coloured maca roots (red, purple, black) contain significant amounts of natural iodine that may avoid the growth of goiters resulting from consumption of the lighter coloured maca. Black maca is considered the strongest in energy and stamina-promoting properties, being both sweet and slightly bitter in taste. Red maca is becoming popular with many people, and has been clinically shown to reduce prostate size in rats.

The nutritional value of dried maca root is high, similar to cereal grains such as rice and wheat. The average composition is 60-75% carbohydrates, 10-14% protein, 8.5% dietary fiber, and 2.2% fats.  In addition to sugars and proteins, maca contains uridine, malic acid, and its benzoyl derivative.

MacaX6Powder-1000pxBuy only certified organic Maca Root and read the label – high protein count is a great indicator of optimal growing conditions and careful processing.  Maca root is a food, for it to be effective and to achieve results, proper dosages should be followed. In keeping with original ancestral Peruvian dosages, you should mix 3/4 to 1 teaspoon of Maca into smoothies, yogurt, herbal teas, fruit juices, etc.maca-root-powder Or if you are using our MACA POWER& Vegetarian Capsules take 2 to 6 500mg Capsules per day or as directed by your health practitioner.  It is best store Maca Root Powder in dark dry cupboard. Some people store it in the refrigerator but this is not necessary but some feel it keeps the powder fresh and the consistency lighter.

Gluten-Free Pizza Crust

wpid-storageemulated0PhotoEditor2014-02-21-20.48.12.png.pngCrispy golden crust and bottom with a soft and chewy center and its gluten-free, you’re going to love this recipe and, definitely not miss the gluten or wheat flour!  This recipe makes two 12 inch or one thick 16 inch crust, I have a pizza stone and haven’t tried to make this just on a pan, but I’m sure a heavy bottom one would work fine, just watch for over browning.   I don’t like to eat much dairy either so I often top my pizza with goat cheese or buffalo mozzarella but make it however you desire!

Oven 425 degrees
Oiled Pizza Stone
Large Bowl or Food Processor with paddle attached
1/2         cup White Rice Flour
1/2         cup Potato Starch
1/3         cup Millet Flour
1/3         cup Sorghum flour
1/4         cup Tapioca flour
1              teaspoon Xantham Gum
1              teaspoon fine Sea Salt
Small sauce pan
1/2         cup Whole Goat Milk
1/2         cup Water
One package or 2 1/4 teaspoons Active Dry Yeast
2             teaspoons Cane Sugar
Small bowl
2             large Egg Whites, lightly beaten
2             tablespoons Extra-Virgin Olive Oil

Combine dry ingredients well.

In small saucepan over medium heat, stir together milk water and heat until warm but not hot,  then, add in yeast and sugar and let sit for a few moments.

In a small bowl, lightly whisk egg whites and 2 tablespoons oil then combine everything in a food processor on medium for about one minute or until a dough ball forms. You can do this by hand too.

Now, transfer to a larger bowl, split dough in half and cover with a tea towel in a warm, draft free spot for 20 minutes to rise.

Bake for  7-9 minutes.  Note:  at this point you can freeze your crust to use another time!

Remove and top then return to the oven for 15-20 minutes or until toppings are cooked and crust is golden brown.  May reduce the oven temperature here if needed.

Crackers – Gluten-free, Grain-Free, Paleo Friendly and Healthy!

Finally…..Crackers! Gluten free, healthy, easy, delicious CRACKERS!   I’ve been working on this post for a while, (going a little cracker crazy as of late) I always make my own crackers by throwing what I know works together but not always so good at writing down what I’ve done.  Below is a few different versions and variations I have managed to keep track of, they have been tried, re-tried, tested and are now ready to share as I’d say some of my fav’s! These recipes are for almond flour and pulp crackers, juice pulp crackers, nut and oat crackers. Check back for more recipes to follow later as new versions get tried and please, get creative, I’d love to hear of your versions!

Almond Pulp Crackers

These crackers made with almond flour or almond milk pulp (more on that in a minute) are highly nutritious, gluten and flour free and very tasty.  They’re addicting so you might want to double your batches.

The first recipe is made with Almond Pulp after making Almond Milk.  You can find that recipe HERE.  These are actually my personal favourite of all the crackers I’ve made below, I love that the pulp isn’t being wasted and the texture of the cracker is perfect!  They are dehydrated in the over.  Of course, if you have a dehydrator please use it but if you oven goes as low as 130 degrees you can use it just the same.

Savoury Herbed Almond Pulp Crackers

Oven to 130 degrees
Baking Sheet lined with parchment paper
Large Mixing bowl
3               cup almond pulp (packed full)
¼             cup Chia Seed, ground (or flax seed meal or both)
¼             cup Oil – Olive, Grapeseed, Sunflower or Coconut
1                teaspoon Sea Salt
¼              cup Nutritional Yeast (or more to taste)
3                tablespoons Mixed Herbs: Thyme, Basil, Parsley, Marjoram, Oregano, Savory

Combine all ingredients in a large bowl and mix well.  Roll into a ball and place on parchment paper lined baking sheet then use your hands to flatten into ¼ inch thickness.  Score desired cracker shape lines.

Dehydrate at 130 degrees for approximately 12 hours or till desired consistency is reached (Softer or crunchier cracker).

Grain-Free Cheesy Herb Cracker Recipe

Oven to 350 degrees
Baking Sheet lined with parchment paper
Large Mixing bowl

2              cups Almond Flour (or pulp from making Almond Milk)
1              teaspoon Baking Soda
1              teaspoon Roasted Garlic, minced
1              teaspoon of Dried Onion, minced
2              teaspoons Italian Herbs: Basil, Marjoram, Rosemary, Sage, Thyme, Savory, Oregano
1/2         teaspoon Turmeric or Paprika (flavour, health and colour)
1              teaspoon of fine Mineral Salt
1              teaspoon Coconut Sugar
1              cup 12 Month Manchego Sheep Cheese, very finely grated (I used a microplane grater)
2              tablespoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil
4              tablespoons Water
1               Egg White, beaten

Combine the ingredients in bowl and stir until a moist, sticky dough forms. Use water and/or oil as needed.

Taste test to adjust your seasonings, I always do!

Roll out dough between parchment paper to desired thickness or ¼ inch thick.

Transfer to baking sheet and make cut lines with a knife or pizza cutter for your crackers shapes.

Bake for 15 minutes or until the dough is set and golden.

Remove and cool. When the dough has cooled, finish the cutting or break apart if possible.

The crackers will be tender and breakable while they are warm. Allow them to cool completely before handling.

These crackers are not super crisp, kind of like a flat bread almost, if you want a drier cracker, use the oven as a dehydrator for 4-6 hours.

Toasted Onion and Garlic Sesame Crackers

Large baking sheet lined with parchment paper
Large bowl
Medium bowl
1 ½        cups Almond Flour
1              teaspoons  Sea Salt
1              tablespoon Onion Powder
1              tablespoon Garlic Powder
½            cup Sesame Seeds
1              tablespoon Grapeseed Oil
Few dashes of Toasted Sesame Oil
1              Egg, whisked until frothy

In a large bowl, combine dry ingredients and stir.

In a small bowl whisk together oil and egg then add to dry, mix well.

Press and roll dough to 1/8 – 1/4 inch thick between parchment paper.

Using a knife or pizza cutter, shape your crackers and transfer to lined baking sheet.

Bake at 350° for 10-12 minutes, until golden brown.  If a crisper cracker is desired follow with drying in the oven at low temp of 130 until crisper, approximately 4-6 hours.

Rosemary Fig Crackers

1 ½         cups Almond Flour
½            teaspoon Himalayan Sea Salt
1               tablespoon Rosemary, minced
4              dried Black Figs, chopped
1               Egg
1               tablespoon Olive Oil

In a large bowl stir together almond flour, salt, rosemary and figs.

In a small bowl mix egg and olive oil until well combined then add to medium bowl.  Mix well.

Roll out dough between 2 sheets of parchment paper until approximately 1/8 – 1/4 inch thick.

Cut dough with a knife or pizza cutter into desired crack shape and size.

Bake at 350° for 10-12 minutes until golden brown. If a crisper cracker is desired follow with drying in the oven at low temp of 130 until crisper, approximately 4-6 hours

Cranberry Orange Pecan Crackers

1 ½         cups Almond Flour
¼             cup Pecans, chopped
¼             cup dried Juice Sweetened Cranberries
1               Orange, zested
½             teaspoon Himalayan Sea Salt
1               teaspoon fresh ground Black Pepper
1               Egg
1               tablespoon Olive Oil

In a large bowl stir together everything except the egg and oil.

In a small bowl mix egg and olive oil until well combined then add to medium bowl.  Mix well.

Roll out dough between 2 sheets of parchment paper until approximately 1/8 – 1/4 inch thick.

Cut dough with a knife or pizza cutter into desired crack shape and size.

Bake at 350° for 10-12 minutes until golden brown. If a crisper cracker is desired follow with drying in the oven at low temp of 130 until crisper, approximately 4-6 hours

Juicer Pulp Crackers

These crackers are made from the pulp left over from juicing.  It’s nice to use some of that fibrous cast off rather than throwing it to the worms all the time.

3              cups Juice Pulp from juicing (carrot, beet, celery, cucumber, spinach, kale, parsley ect)
½             cup ground Flaxseed and Chia seeds (either or both)
¼             cup Nutritional Yeast
¼             cup fresh chopped herb like Cilantro, Parsley or Basil
1               teaspoon Sea Salt
½             teaspoon Paprika
½             teaspoon Onion Powder
½             teaspoon Garlic Powder
*Optional Chilli Pepper spice to taste

Mix all ingredients well in a food processor.  You can do this by hand instead. Add water if needed; I usually find that I don’t need any especially with cucumber and celery pulp, which is moist but if the mixture isn’t sticking together at add water.

Spread mixture on a parchment paper lined baking sheet about a 1/4 inch thickness. Score into cracker-sized squares, and dehydrate at 130 degrees for a couple hours.  Check and break apart, flip and return to finish. Probably another two hours or so but keep flipped every so often to get even drying.

Oat Crackers

These are my take on the old Scotch Oat Cakes, they are nice with jam or a nut butter and honey on top and go great with a tea!

Oven to 350
Food Processor
Medium Bowl
Small Pot
2              cup GF Oats, pulsed in a food processor until coarsely ground (or use quick oats)
1/2         cup Steel Cut Oats, pulsed in a food processor until coarsely ground
1/2         cup Oat Flour
1/4         teaspoon Baking soda
1/4         teaspoon Sea Salt
3/4         cup Water
1               tablespoon Butter
1               tablespoon Maple Syrup or Honey

Combine oatmeal, baking soda, and salt in bowl.

Heat water and butter until butter melts, remove from heat and add maple.

Pour into the center of the oatmeal mix and mix well.

Drop dough on a piece of parchment paper and roll out to about ¼ – 1/8 inch thick.  You can do this between two pieces of parchment paper or with a dusting of oat flour.

Now cut or use a cutter to make desired cracker shape and size.  I used a small jar.

Place crackers on parchment paper lined baking sheet (I just used the same sheet I had for rolling).

Dust with Sea Salt.

Bake for 20-30 minutes, flipping them over every five minutes or so to ensure even baking.

When done, they’ll be crisp and just barely turning golden.   Note: They will continue to firm up as they cool.

Multi- Nut and Seed Crackers

½             cup Almond Flour
½             cup Macadamia Nuts
¼             cup Pumpkin Seeds
2               tablespoons Sunflower Seeds
2               tablespoons Sesame Seeds
2               tablespoons Hemp Seeds
1               tablespoon Golden Flaxmeal
1               tablespoon Chia, ground
½             teaspoon Mineral Salt
1               tablespoon Oil
¼             cup Water

In a food processor, pulse almond flour and macadamias until ground then add in

seeds, flax meal, ground chia and salt until almost fully ground but not to a fine flour.

Add oil and then water gradually until dough ball forms in the food processor.

Roll out dough between 2 pieces of parchment paper to ¼ inch (or desired) thickness then score into desired cracker shapes.

Bake at 275° for 25 to 30 minutes or dehydrate at 130 degrees for 6-8 hours (until crisp).